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Our Lady of the Isles statue surrounded by people visiting

OUR LADY OF ARGYLL AND THE ISLES CHARITY

Providing financial support to the Catholic Church operating in Remote Rural and Island Communities of Scotland.

OUR MISSION

The young people from St Columba’s Primary and Oban High Schools welcome the Papal Nuncio, Archbishop Claudio Gugerotti
Castlebay, Our Lady, Star of the Sea Catholic Church
The visit of the relics of St Therese of Lisieux

Our Lady of Argyll and The Isles (OLAATI) is a National United States Charity and 501(c)(3) tax exempt organization founded in 2023 in Phoenix, AZ with the purpose of providing financial support to the Catholic Church operating in Remote Rural and Island Communities of Scotland.

Working in collaboration with Bishop Brian McGee, 11th Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Argyll and the Isles, OLAATI aims to make a tangible and practical positive impact for remote Scottish Catholic Communities and their families as well as ensuring the many visitors to the Diocese can access the Holy Eucharist and Catholic Mass across the islands and villages of Northern and Western Scotland.

Financial contributions by our generous US donors across the 50 States support active Priest stipends and the training of Seminarians to ensure the Holy Mass is locally available where possible in our remote parishes. They also assist supporting Retired Priests who have donated a life of service to the Diocese and their communities, as well as critically supporting the heavy financial burden of the many urgent building repairs required to rescue, maintain and preserve the beautiful churches gracing the Islands, Lochs and Glens of Western and Northern Scotland.

OUR INSPIRATION

The statue of Our Lady of the Isles (Gaelic: Moire ro Naomh nan Eilean) is situated on the western slopes of Ruabhal, a hill near the northern end of South Uist. It was commissioned following proposals from the Ministry of Defense for a large missile testing range. This would have involved construction of a military town as well as facilities for building missiles. There was concern that this would destroy much of the island’s way of life, culture and language. Resistance to the proposals was led by Canon John Morrison, the local parish priest. He commissioned and raised funds for the construction of the statue. It was completed in 1957, and dedicated in 1958. Eight months after the dedication the military project was announced to be scaled down with no new town and no removal of people.

Today, as vocations have dropped and the number of parishes, chapels, and missions are exceeding the number of priests available to serve, the amount of charitable giving has dropped as well.  Aging structures make the upkeep of our parishes harder, and a lack of available priests leaves many without regular access to the Mass. By bringing together the larger body of the church, OLAATI aims to help support and preserve the Catholic way of life in the Western Isles of Scotland and strengthen the Diocese in both funds and numbers.

 

Our Lady of the Isles Statue
The statue of Our Lady of the Isles
Ceremony held at the statue of Our Lady of the Isles
Our Lady or the Isles statue overlooking the countryside with sheep

״FOR GOD IS NOT UNJUST SO AS TO OVERLOOK YOUR WORK AND THE LOVE YOU HAVE DEMONSTRATED FOR HIS NAME BY HAVING SERVED AND CONTINUING TO SERVE THE HOLY ONES."

HEBREWS 6:10

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